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Rural Health Leadership Radio™

Over the last ten years, over 100 rural hospitals have closed their doors. Roughly one in three rural hospitals have been identified as “at risk.” If there was ever a need for strong leadership, that time is now. RHLR’s mission is to provide a forum to have conversations with rural health leaders to discuss and share ideas about what is working, what is not working, lessons learned, success stories, strategies, things to avoid and anything else you want to talk and hear about. RHLR provides a voice for rural health. The only investment is your time, and our goal is to make sure you receive a huge return on your investment. For more information, visit www.rhlradio.com or e-mail bill@billauxier.com.
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Now displaying: November, 2018
Nov 27, 2018

Amy Yauk is the Director of Nursing at Harper County Community Hospital (HCCH), in Buffalo, OK. HCCH was recently recognized by the National Rural Health Association as a Top 20 CAH.

“We pretty much always know all of our patients so it’s real easy to care for them like they’re family.”

Amy started her career at HCCH in 1999 as an LPN. She had identified nursing as a good career path for a single mother and her grandfather also pushed her in that direction. Enrolled in the Oklahoma University BSN program, after three years in the program, she was eligible to test for the LPN license, which she successfully did. Simultaneously, she continued her education to finish her BSN in 2000. Amy became the Director of Nursing 3 years ago.

Amy grew up in a small town, Kiowa, Kansas. In 1999 she moved to Buffalo, OK, where she started her nursing career at HCCH.

Amy has worked in several areas of nursing, including the ER, Med-Surg, OB, Critical Care and Home Case Management and In-Home Nursing Visits.

She describes herself as “a normal person living out here in Oklahoma.” She has two children and one grandson. Her husband coaches boy’s football, basketball and baseball, so if she’s not at the hospital, you can probably find her at a ball game.

Nov 20, 2018

Marc Ringel grew up in Chicago, went to college in New Orleans and Madrid, and did his medical training back in Chicago.  He even drove a Chicago Transit Authority bus one summer. Nevertheless, his life led him to serve with the National Health Service Corps as a general practitioner in Yuma, Colorado, a prairie town of 2000 people.  And the die was cast. Marc fell in love with country people, country ways, and rural family practice.

“Science is but one avenue of understanding.”

-Digital Healing:  People, Information, Healthcare, p. 10

Dr. Ringel has been a rural family doctor in Wisconsin and in Colorado ever since, and has been a teacher to medical students, nurse practitioner students, residents and practicing physicians.  

“Why do you crave a person to talk to?  Because if given some latitude, a person can still solve problems that a computer cannot anticipate.  Just as importantly, because a person can, in the space of a few sentences, form an idea of who you are and respond to you.  That interpersonal connection is one of the things that makes us human beings tick.”

-Digital Healing:  People, Information, Healthcare, p. 55

He has written several books and a number of medical articles, as well producing regular columns in the lay press and commentaries on Colorado Public Radio.  

Ringel’s abiding interest in healthcare informatics stems largely from his understanding, acquired firsthand, that information and connection are the keys to the success of any medical practice, especially a rural one.  

His latest book, Digital Healing:  People, Information and Healthcare, was published this year by Taylor&Francis.  

Marc has been sort of retired since last summer.  He has three children and two grandchildren. He lives in Greeley, Colorado.  

Nov 12, 2018

Happy National Rural Health Day!  To help us celebrate, we’re having a conversation with Kristine Sande.

“It’s really great to focus on what makes rural communities great!”

Kristine Sande is an Associate Director at the University of North Dakota Center for Rural Health.   She also directs the Rural Health Information Hub, formerly known as the Rural Assistance Center, which serves as a national information portal for rural health.  

“The people who provide healthcare within those rural communities are so important and it is great to have a day to celebrate that.”

Prior to the launch of RHI Hub in 2002, she served as the Project Coordinator of the North Dakota Flex Program and worked at two different rural electric cooperatives. 

Kristine was raised on a family farm 20 miles outside of a North Dakota town of 1,200 people. She has a Bachelor’s degree in Economics and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of North Dakota.

Nov 8, 2018

In this special episode of Rural Health Leadership Radio™, we honor our Veterans. Veteran’s Day is right around the corner, and to recognize our Veterans living in Rural America we’re having a conversation with Hilda Heady.

Hilda has 50 years of experience as a rural health leader, Hilda has had a variety of roles serving rural America including being a direct service professional, a health professions’ educator and as an advocate for rural families and rural women’s health care. Hilda is also a strong advocate for Veterans.

“I began to notice this pattern of a number of veterans who lived in rural areas that we served.”

Hilda Heady’s work and advocacy is focused on how best to inform policies and practices which impact rural people and the service institutions in their communities.

“Not everyone has a sense of service, is as patriotic and believes in service to family and community like rural people do.”

She served as a charter member of the VA Secretary’s Rural Health Advisory Committee from 2008 to 2013 and as the 2005 President of the National Rural Health Association. For 18 years, she was the associate vice president for rural health at the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center at WVU, and for seven years the senior vice president with Atlas Research, a service disabled veteran owned small business.

Hilda is a frequent national speaker on rural culture and resilience, and issues faced by rural veterans and their families.

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