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Rural Health Leadership Radio™

Over the last ten years, over 100 rural hospitals have closed their doors. Roughly one in three rural hospitals have been identified as “at risk.” If there was ever a need for strong leadership, that time is now. RHLR’s mission is to provide a forum to have conversations with rural health leaders to discuss and share ideas about what is working, what is not working, lessons learned, success stories, strategies, things to avoid and anything else you want to talk and hear about. RHLR provides a voice for rural health. The only investment is your time, and our goal is to make sure you receive a huge return on your investment. For more information, visit www.rhlradio.com or e-mail bill@billauxier.com.
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Now displaying: December, 2019
Dec 31, 2019

This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio we’re talking about technology and transportation in rural health. We’re having that conversation with Jack Salo, Executive Director of the Rural Health Network of South Central New York.

“There’s a lot that technology can do to help us become more efficient and provide a higher level of transportation service to the rural population.”

~Jack Salo

Jack is a rural advocate and non-profit executive who has worked in South Central New York State for the past 35 years. His experiences range from leading health, human services to youth development organizations. As a rural health advocate, Jack works with a wide range of partners to address the root causes of health issues and health disparities. Central to his effort has been providing leadership to develop collaborative, regional projects including Getthere (transportation services), Rural Health Services Corps (AmeriCorps and VISTA services), and The Food & Health Network of South Central New York.

“I think we have to build on our strong community of practitioners and people who love rural health and rural places.”

~Jack Salo

Jack received his BA degree in Geography and his MS degree in Education from SUNY Oneota. Jack currently serves on the Board of Directors of the NYW Association for Rural Health and Care Compass Network, a regional DSRIP – Medicaid reform agency. He lives with his family on a small, diversified farm near Norwich, New York.

Dec 24, 2019

This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio we’re having a special Christmas episode where we talk about Angel Flight East. We’re having that conversation with Jessica Ames, Outreach and Events Director at Angel Flight East, and Dr. Greg Vallino, an Optometrist at Village Optical and volunteer pilot for Angel Flight East.

“There’s a light coming in for rural health and I feel like a lot more people are starting to pay attention to it now.”

~Jessica Ames

Jessica attended Millersville University in Pennsylvania where she majored in Public Relations. During her college career she interned with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society in Harrisburg where she developed her passion for working in nonprofit organizations. After graduating, she knew the field she wanted to work in and found Angel Flight East in 2014 and has been with the organization for five years.

“My wish is that one day people look up in the sky, and instead of seeing just a general aviation aircraft they would say “there’s another angel flying right by.””

~Dr. Greg Villano

Dr. Greg Villano is an Optometrist in Pennsylvania for a family-oriented private practice, as well as being a volunteer pilot for Angel Flight East. Dr. Villano grew his passion for flight his whole life and pursued his pilot license at 40 years old. He was introduced to Angel Flight East and has enjoyed the amazing feeling of making someone happy through both his volunteer and professional work.

Dec 17, 2019

This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio, we’re talking about recruiting in rural areas. We’re having that conversation with Alicia Ekstrom, Recruiting Specialist at The Chautauqua Center.

“When it comes down to it, that’s what really sells individuals is that – the meaning behind it and the emotion and passion that I do have for the Chautauqua Center.”

~Alicia Ekstrom

Alicia received her Bachelor’s degree in Health Service Management with a minor in Spanish in 2012 and has worked in various healthcare settings including insurance companies, group homes, and local hospitals. She has a passion for fitness and wellness, and teaches a fitness class called POUND. POUND is not only a physical workout, but also provides emotional and mental relief for all ages and capabilities.

“Leadership is more so someone guiding a group of people and providing that support and direction…”

~Alicia Ekstrom

Alicia was born and raised in Buffalo, New York and recently moved to the rural area known as Chautauqua County. She has always had a passion for helping others, and thrives on the constantly evolving nature of healthcare. Alicia enjoys the challenges and opportunities of recruiting and working in a rural area, and hopes to help fill the gaps present in the rural healthcare setting.

Dec 10, 2019

This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio, we’re talking about turning around distressed industries. We’re having that conversation with Tee Faircloth, the Founder and CEO of Coordinated Care Inc.

“Right now we’ve got a chance to really make a huge impact and really start to see this rural renaissance…”

~Tee Faircloth

Tee is originally from a small town in Georgia, and after college started a career in New York in finance, where he developed an expertise in industries that needed change and turnaround. After working in New York he decided to start his first company, a safari outfitter, where he would eventually create a line of clothing using nanotechnology to allow for extended time in extreme African heat.

“It’s about figuring out within your healthcare system, where you can add value.”

~Tee Faircloth

Tee’s experiences established his desire to spend his career turning around industries by figuring out where there is need and opportunity waiting to be realized. He has a 20-year record rebooting insolvent companies and distressed industries in the most effective way possible. As CEO of Coordinated Care Inc., he is at the forefront of revitalizing rural healthcare to make a difference for the 70 million Americans who depend on rural hospitals. If you would like to contact Tee, see his information below!

Email: tee.faircloth@coordinatedcareinc.com
Website: https://www.coordinatedcareinc.com/

Dec 3, 2019

This week on Rural Health Leadership Radio, we’re talking about pharmacy in rural areas. We’re having that conversation with David Bowyer, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice at the University of Charleston, School of Pharmacy.

“You have to be willing to take chances and be willing to stand up for what you believe in…”

~David Bowyer

David is a West Virginia native, where he attended West Virginia University and graduated from the School of Pharmacy. David has been a pharmacist for 35 years, having served in both hospital and community pharmacy, and made the switch to academia fourteen years ago.

“What excites me the most is the acceptance and willingness of the medical community to utilize the pharmacist and other members of the healthcare team to develop a real team approach to healthcare.”

~David Bowyer

David now serves as the Department Chair and Associate Professor at the University of Charleston, where he has 12 pharmacists working under him. To David, pharmacy was a way to remain in healthcare and take care of patients in a different way than other healthcare professionals.

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