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Rural Health Leadership Radio™

Over the last ten years, over 100 rural hospitals have closed their doors. Roughly one in three rural hospitals have been identified as “at risk.” If there was ever a need for strong leadership, that time is now. RHLR’s mission is to provide a forum to have conversations with rural health leaders to discuss and share ideas about what is working, what is not working, lessons learned, success stories, strategies, things to avoid and anything else you want to talk and hear about. RHLR provides a voice for rural health. The only investment is your time, and our goal is to make sure you receive a huge return on your investment. For more information, visit www.rhlradio.com or e-mail bill@billauxier.com.
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Nov 8, 2016

Improving the health status of people in America’s most underserved communities has been the mission and calling of Benjamin Anderson, who currently serves as CEO of Kearny County Hospital, a comprehensive rural health complex located in southwest Kansas.

Anderson has received national acclaim for his work in physician recruitment, health promotion, women’s health initiatives, rural healthcare delivery innovation, and research-based transitions from volume to value.  His work has been featured by National Public Radio, Sports Illustrated, ABC News, the Associated Press, and in nearly every major healthcare publication.  He regularly leads teams of people to serve at Eden Children’s Village, an orphanage and medical clinic in northern Zimbabwe.

“One of the key things that I try to talk about is, the providers grew up in one culture and the administrators grew up in another culture. That culture may be in the same hospital, but they could've been miles apart.”

His career in healthcare administration began in 2009 as CEO of Ashland Health Center, a struggling hospital and the only healthcare provider in a Kansas town of 900 people.   There, he led an effort that dramatically revitalized the community’s healthcare services, recruiting and retaining several medical providers to serve a multi-county area on the border of Kansas and Oklahoma.  

Benjamin holds Bachelor of English and Master of Business Administration degrees from Drury University in Springfield, Missouri.  This January, he completed the course work for his Master of Healthcare Delivery Science degree from Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire.  He and his wife, Kaila, have four children ages 3, 3, 1 and 1.

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